Bike Lanes

To meet the statute language

To meet the statute language “a lane marked for bicycle use,” the lane must have this stencil in it.

A bicycle lane is a part of the roadway intended to provide bicyclists with a more “comfortable” experience. Feeling safe does not equate to being safe. Research into the relative safety of bike lanes and shared lanes is inconclusive. The Federal Highway Administration does not have a crash reduction factor for bicycle lanes. Bicycle lanes are intended as “preferential use” lanes, not mandatory use lanes (although Florida statute 316.2065(5) now makes their use mandatory, with exceptions for unsafe conditions and situations).

In order to meet the statutory language, the paved area in question must be marked with a bicycle symbol and a directional arrow. There are numerous spaces on area roads that do not meet minimum width standards and other characteristics of correct bike lane design. Bicyclists are permitted to use such spaces, but are not required to. The width of the adjacent lane then determines whether or not the bicyclist is required to share that lane.

The minimum standard width for a bicycle lane is five feet from the lane stripe to the curb face, and a minimum of four feet of asphalt beyond the gutter pan. For state roadways with design speeds 50 mph and higher, the minimum width is 6.5 feet.

— Enforcement for Bicyclist Safety, a publication for law enforcement by MetroPlan Orlando. read online | download pdf

Category: Bike Lanes
To meet the statute language

To meet the statute language “a lane marked for bicycle use,” the lane must have this stencil in it.

A bicycle lane is a part of the roadway intended to provide bicyclists with a more “comfortable” experience. Feeling safe does not equate to being safe. Research into the relative safety of bike lanes and shared lanes is inconclusive. The Federal Highway Administration does not have a crash reduction factor for bicycle lanes. Bicycle lanes are intended as “preferential use” lanes, not mandatory use lanes (although Florida statute 316.2065(5) now makes their use mandatory, with exceptions for unsafe conditions and situations).

In order to meet the statutory language, the paved area in question must be marked with a bicycle symbol and a directional arrow. There are numerous spaces on area roads that do not meet minimum width standards and other characteristics of correct bike lane design. Bicyclists are permitted to use such spaces, but are not required to. The width of the adjacent lane then determines whether or not the bicyclist is required to share that lane.

The minimum standard width for a bicycle lane is five feet from the lane stripe to the curb face, and a minimum of four feet of asphalt beyond the gutter pan. For state roadways with design speeds 50 mph and higher, the minimum width is 6.5 feet.

— Enforcement for Bicyclist Safety, a publication for law enforcement by MetroPlan Orlando. read online | download pdf

Pedestrians in Bike Lanes

Question John asked: I live in a deed restricted community in Tampa Florida (a master planned community) with clearly marked “bike lanes” and adjacent sidewalks. Frequently, when I am riding in the marked bike lane, I run into runners, joggers,

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Bike Lane as Shared-Use Path

Question Dan asked: I’m seeking a definitive answer to the question of whether a bike lane can also legally serve pedestrians when no unpaved shoulder exists. And if so, is there a MUTCD-approved sign to indicate such a lane. As

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Bike Lane Ends at Intersection

Question Doc asked: I have 2 intersections with traffic lights that I go through every day, where the bike lane ends and there is no bike lane on the other side of the intersection. One intersection has multiple lanes on

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Unsafe Bike Lanes

Question Graham asked: BC Sheriffs rigorously enforce riding in the bike lane in Weston. However I maintain that they allow parking, joggers, walkers, lawn people and others to use the lanes without any enforcement. Also the condition of the lanes

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes, Bike Paths

Human Powered Vehicles in a Bike Lane

Question Alvilda asked: Human-Powered Vehicles are becoming more and more popular in other countries. As a downtown dweller who rides an adult tricycle as my primary means of transportation, I’m looking into acquiring an HPV with more seating, more cargo

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Maintenance of Bike Lanes

Question Frans asked: Taking the full lane or riding close to the middle. The city has bike lanes at different streets. Good, well they are poorly maintained and most are no longer 4 feet wide. I asked the county to

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes, Lane Width & Sharing

Complete Streets Design

Question Dennis asked: We have a lot of current road “improvement” projects planned or underway in downtown Fort Lauderdale under the Complete Streets program. There is a push to remove vehicle travel lanes in favor of bicycle lanes and in

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Parking in Bike Lanes

Question Claus asked: Our community is debating on having the county put in bike lanes. The property owners’ association board is stating that garbage trucks, lawn service trucks and other private service trucks can stop and remain in the bike

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Door Zone Bike Lanes

Question Dennis asked: I was involved as the car owner in a bike collision in Jupiter, FL the other day.  I had just completed a direct drive-in (no backing) parallel parking on Beach Road (A1A) in Jupiter, FL.  I was about 8

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes, Misc

Bike Direction on the Sidewalk

Question Doug asked: When a bike lane is present on the road way is it against the law to ride against traffic on the sidewalk?

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes, Sidewalks & Crosswalks