Bike Lanes

To meet the statute language

To meet the statute language “a lane marked for bicycle use,” the lane must have this stencil in it.

A bicycle lane is a part of the roadway intended to provide bicyclists with a more “comfortable” experience. Feeling safe does not equate to being safe. Research into the relative safety of bike lanes and shared lanes is inconclusive. The Federal Highway Administration does not have a crash reduction factor for bicycle lanes. Bicycle lanes are intended as “preferential use” lanes, not mandatory use lanes (although Florida statute 316.2065(5) now makes their use mandatory, with exceptions for unsafe conditions and situations).

In order to meet the statutory language, the paved area in question must be marked with a bicycle symbol and a directional arrow. There are numerous spaces on area roads that do not meet minimum width standards and other characteristics of correct bike lane design. Bicyclists are permitted to use such spaces, but are not required to. The width of the adjacent lane then determines whether or not the bicyclist is required to share that lane.

The minimum standard width for a bicycle lane is five feet from the lane stripe to the curb face, and a minimum of four feet of asphalt beyond the gutter pan. For state roadways with design speeds 50 mph and higher, the minimum width is 6.5 feet.

— Enforcement for Bicyclist Safety, a publication for law enforcement by MetroPlan Orlando. read online | download pdf

Category: Bike Lanes
To meet the statute language

To meet the statute language “a lane marked for bicycle use,” the lane must have this stencil in it.

A bicycle lane is a part of the roadway intended to provide bicyclists with a more “comfortable” experience. Feeling safe does not equate to being safe. Research into the relative safety of bike lanes and shared lanes is inconclusive. The Federal Highway Administration does not have a crash reduction factor for bicycle lanes. Bicycle lanes are intended as “preferential use” lanes, not mandatory use lanes (although Florida statute 316.2065(5) now makes their use mandatory, with exceptions for unsafe conditions and situations).

In order to meet the statutory language, the paved area in question must be marked with a bicycle symbol and a directional arrow. There are numerous spaces on area roads that do not meet minimum width standards and other characteristics of correct bike lane design. Bicyclists are permitted to use such spaces, but are not required to. The width of the adjacent lane then determines whether or not the bicyclist is required to share that lane.

The minimum standard width for a bicycle lane is five feet from the lane stripe to the curb face, and a minimum of four feet of asphalt beyond the gutter pan. For state roadways with design speeds 50 mph and higher, the minimum width is 6.5 feet.

— Enforcement for Bicyclist Safety, a publication for law enforcement by MetroPlan Orlando. read online | download pdf

Bus Stopped in Bike Lane

Question Steven asked: What are Florida’s rules and regulations on transit buses crossing and stopping in designated bike lanes to pick up and drop off passengers?

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Making a Right Turn Across a Bike Lane

Question Myriam asked: If I am driving down sunset street and there is a bicycle path to my right and I need to make a right turn on 137th avenue, do I turn right from my lane, or do I

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes, Making Turns

Bicycle Groups and Bike Lanes

Question Elizabeth asked: Every weekend there are cyclists that gather in large numbers. They clump together spilling out of the bike lane and blocking at least half of the road. This requires vehicles to drive at a snails pace until

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes, Impeding Traffic

Golf Carts in Bike Lanes

Question Alan asked: Perhaps you can give some advice as to the legality and options we have regarding our GSCDD Board decision to convert the designated bicycle lanes in our community to ones which permit golf carts to utilize those

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Bike Lanes Required?

Question Anon asked: The Palmer Ranch Association in Sarasota County is proposing a large community center on Palmer Ranch Parkway where there is NOT a bike lane. From what I see from the plans NO bike lane is under consideration

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Stopping on a Bike Lane

Question Amy asked: I have looked at the bike lane parking info posted and it has been very informative. I just wanted to get your input about the legality of momentarily pulling into a bike lane to pick up a

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes, Making Turns, Rights & Duties

Parking in a Bike Lane

Question David asked: In July on this year my brother was killed in a bicycle accident. He was riding in a neighborhood bike lane, marked as a bike lane with a bicycle and arrow, he ran into a trailer parked

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Bike Facilities on County Roads

Question Amanda asked: In response to a post on 10-5-09 you indicated that you were aware of a lawsuit filed to determine the applicability of Section 335.065 (and the Greenbook) to a county roadway. Can you tell me what case

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Pedestrians in Bike Lanes

Question John asked: I live in a deed restricted community in Tampa Florida (a master planned community) with clearly marked “bike lanes” and adjacent sidewalks. Frequently, when I am riding in the marked bike lane, I run into runners, joggers,

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes

Bike Lane as Shared-Use Path

Question Dan asked: I’m seeking a definitive answer to the question of whether a bike lane can also legally serve pedestrians when no unpaved shoulder exists. And if so, is there a MUTCD-approved sign to indicate such a lane. As

Posted in Ask Geo, Bike Lanes