Bike Lanes

To meet the statute language

To meet the statute language “a lane marked for bicycle use,” the lane must have this stencil in it.

A bicycle lane is a part of the roadway intended to provide bicyclists with a more “comfortable” experience. Feeling safe does not equate to being safe. Research into the relative safety of bike lanes and shared lanes is inconclusive. The Federal Highway Administration does not have a crash reduction factor for bicycle lanes. Bicycle lanes are intended as “preferential use” lanes, not mandatory use lanes (although Florida statute 316.2065(5) now makes their use mandatory, with exceptions for unsafe conditions and situations).

In order to meet the statutory language, the paved area in question must be marked with a bicycle symbol and a directional arrow. There are numerous spaces on area roads that do not meet minimum width standards and other characteristics of correct bike lane design. Bicyclists are permitted to use such spaces, but are not required to. The width of the adjacent lane then determines whether or not the bicyclist is required to share that lane.

The minimum standard width for a bicycle lane is five feet from the lane stripe to the curb face, and a minimum of four feet of asphalt beyond the gutter pan. For state roadways with design speeds 50 mph and higher, the minimum width is 6.5 feet.

— Enforcement for Bicyclist Safety, a publication for law enforcement by MetroPlan Orlando. read online | download pdf

Category: Bike Lanes
To meet the statute language

To meet the statute language “a lane marked for bicycle use,” the lane must have this stencil in it.

A bicycle lane is a part of the roadway intended to provide bicyclists with a more “comfortable” experience. Feeling safe does not equate to being safe. Research into the relative safety of bike lanes and shared lanes is inconclusive. The Federal Highway Administration does not have a crash reduction factor for bicycle lanes. Bicycle lanes are intended as “preferential use” lanes, not mandatory use lanes (although Florida statute 316.2065(5) now makes their use mandatory, with exceptions for unsafe conditions and situations).

In order to meet the statutory language, the paved area in question must be marked with a bicycle symbol and a directional arrow. There are numerous spaces on area roads that do not meet minimum width standards and other characteristics of correct bike lane design. Bicyclists are permitted to use such spaces, but are not required to. The width of the adjacent lane then determines whether or not the bicyclist is required to share that lane.

The minimum standard width for a bicycle lane is five feet from the lane stripe to the curb face, and a minimum of four feet of asphalt beyond the gutter pan. For state roadways with design speeds 50 mph and higher, the minimum width is 6.5 feet.

— Enforcement for Bicyclist Safety, a publication for law enforcement by MetroPlan Orlando. read online | download pdf

Riding Abreast

Question Keegan asked: My brother has been to worlds for triathalons for the past 3 years and we both have had question about his training and we haven’t been able to find answers to them for a long time…he trains

Bike Lane Card on Window

Question Howard asked: Can you place a card stating it is” illegal to park in bike lane” on windshield of car that is parked in the bike lane?

Dashed Bike Lane Lines

Question Herman asked: Why does the line that separates a bike lane from the travel lane turn to dashed at an intersection?

Scooter in a Bike lane

Question Lisa asked: Can you ride a 49cc scooter in the bike lane in Florida?

Riding Two or More Abreast

Question Sandy asked: I live in Weston, FL, where there are specific bike lanes. However there are “clubs” that ride together, 2-3-4-5 abreast at times that literally take over the entire right lane for drivers of autos. Is this legal?

Bicycles in Ft. Lauderdale

Question Shannon asked: Is a biker required to use a bike lane even if they do not feel it is safe? For example, in Fort Lauderdale, there is a bike lane going over the 17th street causeway. There is also

Red Light at T-intersection

Question Mark asked: If a cyclist is riding in a bike lane or shoulder and come upon a red light, must the cyclist stop if the only intersecting road is on the opposite lane (a T-intersection)? Is there a difference

Pedestrians in Bike Lanes

Question Susan asked: My question has to do with cycling on a marked bike lane within a gated community that has a golf course and golf carts are also riding in the bike lane. The lane is specifically marked as

Impeding Other Traffic

Question Sean asked: A group of riders and myself (also a rider) were discussing the age old question of whether it’s better, from both a safety and legality standpoint, whether it’s better for us to ride single file in our

Bus Stopped in Bike Lane

Question Steven asked: What are Florida’s rules and regulations on transit buses crossing and stopping in designated bike lanes to pick up and drop off passengers?