Apartment Bicycle Parking

Question

Nicole asked: Should my apartment complex provide the residents with bike parking racks? I live in an apartment complex and residents cant park their bikes underneath the stairs, on their balcony or inside their apartment. The apartment complex lacks bike parking racks or any other designated bike parking spaces.

Answer

There is no statutory requirement to provide bicycle parking or storage facilities. An apartment building is a private company and can make the rules as they wish. You should check with the board of directors or company owners and ask them to provide appropriate facilities. See this post:

http://flbikelaw.org/2013/01/bikes-in-apartments/

Posted in Ask Geo, Misc
3 comments on “Apartment Bicycle Parking
  1. Jake says:

    I think that’s nonsense that you can not put your bike in your own apartment. Never ever heard of that in any rules..

  2. HarryB says:

    The government (“we the people”) can require the owners of private apartment complexes (and other buildings) to provide safe and secure places for people to park their bicycles as has been done for automobiles. Some cities such as Orlando and Miami have made a start.

    You might live in such a location, although most of these laws are relatively new and usually apply only to new construction or significant renovations. The following website can help search for such laws: https://www.municode.com/library/fl . Select the city and then enter “bicycle” into the search box and you should find a list of all regulations which have been adopted pertaining to bicycles.

  3. Any prohibition on bringing a bicycle into an apartment or onto one’s balcony should be mentioned in the tenant’s lease agreement.

    Municipal requirements for parking provisions in new residential and commercial development are typically kept in a table in the municipal code’s land development regulations, aka the “zoning code”. Building inspectors are supposed to check that requirements have been met before issuing a certificate of occupancy. In an existing complex, the city has little leverage to require additional parking (or other changes in parking) unless the site is redeveloped.

Leave a Reply